Pedagogy

Want to tear students from their phones? Learn their names

Submitted by Eliza.Compton on Thu, 16/09/2021 - 09:01
View
Article type
Article

The challenge of cultivating student attention has never been more intense than it will be in the coming academic year. Faculty have been battling the distracting power of student devices in the classroom for a decade or two, and during the pandemic the integration of screens into education has intensified. Continuous engagement with our devices over the past 18 months will likely make it more challenging for students to pull their eyes away from their screens and focus on in-person classroom activities.

Standfirst
Holding students’ attention in a world of digital distractions is tough, but James Lang explains why remembering and using their names can make the task less herculean
Teaser
Holding students’ attention in a world of digital distractions is tough, but James Lang explains why remembering and using their names can make the task less herculean

Designing ‘knowledge checker’ quizzes that motivate students to review feedback and revise learning

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Wed, 08/09/2021 - 09:00
View
Article type
Article

Assignment feedback is key to helping students improve and correct their understanding so they can build upon solid foundations of knowledge as their course progresses.

Yet, traditionally only about 30 per cent of students review their assignment feedback in my experience of teaching. This feedback consists of answers to quizzes and/or comments on how to improve the quality of their writing.

Having experimented with different forms of feedback – written remarks, reports, pre-recorded video discussions – I’ve found the engagement level remains at around 30 per cent.

Standfirst
Jonathan Sim advises on designing regular quizzes as a tool to ensure students review their assignment feedback and address gaps in their understanding
Teaser
Jonathan Sim advises on designing regular quizzes as a tool to ensure students review their assignment feedback and address gaps in their understanding

Place-based learning in digital universities

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Fri, 03/09/2021 - 00:01
View
Article type
Video
Standfirst
A discussion of how the exploration and understanding of a place can be the backbone of higher education teaching and learning, whether delivered online or in-person
Teaser
A discussion of how the exploration and understanding of a place can be the backbone of higher education teaching and learning, whether delivered online or in-person

Teaching with Lego: using plastic bricks to encourage play and interaction in class

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Thu, 02/09/2021 - 09:00
View
Article type
Article

The transition from “delivery mode”, where students listen and make notes, to learning activities that require their active engagement and interaction can be challenging. But when I’ve introduced Lego to the class, these transitions have been different.

Standfirst
Dan Swanton explains how using Lego to demonstrate and apply lessons in class promotes play and interaction leading to better engagement and peer discussion as part of active learning design
Teaser
Dan Swanton explains how using Lego to demonstrate and apply lessons in class promotes play and interaction leading to better engagement and peer discussion as part of active learning design

Follow the (learning) science and put problem solving at the centre of teaching

Submitted by sara.custer on Tue, 31/08/2021 - 01:00
View
Article type
Article

The disruption of higher education due to Covid-19, particularly the sudden forced switch to online and digital learning, has stimulated much thought as to what lessons and improvements higher education institutions (HEIs) could take away from this experience.

Standfirst
Rather than a digital transformation, universities should undergo a learning transformation that supports evidence-based teaching, argue Carl Wieman and Bror Saxberg
Teaser
Rather than a digital transformation, universities should undergo a learning transformation that supports effective technology and evidence-based teaching, argue Carl Wieman and Bror Saxberg

How challenging can my content be?

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Mon, 30/08/2021 - 09:00
View
Article type
Article

When designing a sequence of learning, there are a few things to consider before you decide how inherently complex or difficult your content can be. I wish to focus on a concept from cognitive load theory described as intrinsic load.

Standfirst
Paul Moss explores the concept of cognitive load as a way to determine how challenging your learning content should be to remain effective
Teaser
Paul Moss explores the concept of cognitive load as a way to determine how challenging your learning content should be to remain effective

Virtual classroom connections: enhancing three presence elements via online tools

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Fri, 27/08/2021 - 09:00
View
Article type
Article

Maintaining teaching, social and cognitive presence as part of the community of inquiry (CoI) proposed in the work of Randy Garrison, emeritus professor at the University of Calgary, has long been key tenet of higher education. But in online learning, designing and implementing learning activities to address these presence elements and maintain engagement and connection are even more essential.

Standfirst
Nguyen Hoang Thuan and Pham Cong Hiep provide practical tips for enhancing three types of presence – teaching, social and cognitive – in online learning and teaching, based on their research
Teaser
Nguyen Hoang Thuan and Pham Cong Hiep provide practical tips for enhancing three types of presence – teaching, social and cognitive – in online learning and teaching, based on their research

How to assess if online tools will enhance learning experiences

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Thu, 26/08/2021 - 09:00
View
Article type
Article

The pressure and excitement of the online learning space can feel a bit like a Christmas tree. Keen to have your tree shine brighter than your neighbours’, you add extra tinsel and another bauble. If you’re not careful, however, you can find yourself chucking all kinds of mismatched decorations at it and, before you know it, the tree looks a mess and is tipping over under the weight of good intentions.

Standfirst
Elizabeth Ellis offers five tips for assessing and selecting digital education tools that will improve rather than distract from your teaching
Teaser
Elizabeth Ellis offers five tips for assessing and selecting digital education tools that will improve rather than distract from your teaching

Guiding students to learn from each other through peer feedback

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Mon, 23/08/2021 - 09:59
View
Article type
Article

How do we create a culture in which students learn from each other during the process of producing an assignment? One place to start is through peer review, in which students give and receive feedback on each other’s work. However, some students resist engaging in peer review. At our university in China, this appears to be linked to our students’ previous educational experiences and wider cultural influences. In our experience, teachers can address this problem by considering how best to support students in critiquing each other’s work.

Standfirst
Sam Evans and David Collett share a framework to guide students in effective peer review to boost learning outcomes
Teaser
Sam Evans and David Collett share a framework to guide students in effective peer review to boost learning outcomes

A pedagogy of kindness: the cornerstone for student learning and wellness

Submitted by miranda.prynne on Fri, 20/08/2021 - 09:00
View
Article type
Article

When a home is constructed from stone, the cornerstone is the first stone to be laid. It orients the placement of all that follows. It can’t be added on later. The same is true of a pedagogy of kindness. It can’t be a checklist that is pasted over a syllabus that already exists – it needs to be foundational to course design and central to an instructor’s teaching practice.

Standfirst
Fiona Rawle outlines a pedagogy founded on human connection, care and compassion that improves student learning outcomes
Teaser
Fiona Rawle outlines a pedagogy founded on human connection, care and compassion that improves student learning outcomes